Sunday, April 19, 2009

Army day in Iran!




21 comments:

an average patriot said...

Naj
Man not a word needed. The pictures tell the answer to many questions. I wish those pictures found their way to US main stream media!

Gail said...

Hi Naj-

your photos are powerful. Dare I say, I was stunned. "thank you" for always posting the truth.

Love Gail
peace.....

Naj said...

Jim: why?
Gail: how do you mean stunned?

Gail said...

Hi Naj-

By stunned I meant the intensity of the numbers, and the strength of such. I am often 'taken back' by your photos, in a good and respectful way - remember, you are educating me in SO many ways - and some times I am "hit" with it.

Does this answer your question?

Love Gail
peace.....

Naj said...

It does, Gail.

I am actually curious about how these pictures would "touch" the spectators. This is aesthetization of military; and in my opinion this is not very nice, but the aesthetic quality of these pictures still affect us ... and this is something I feel uneasy about and I am curious about what kind of an impression it leaves on others.

Gail said...

I am glad I answered your question well enough.

They are truly very powerful images of numbers and strength.

Gail
peace......

Anonymous said...

You are responding to the sight of virile younge men with weapons. A powerful contemporary invocation of a collective memory dating from the Paleolithic times.

pen Name

Naj said...

Leni Riefenstahl already cashed on it some 70 years ago!

Gail said...

Help.

I missed completely the relevance of the last 2 comments. Was anonymous writing to me?

Let me know Naj when you have a moment.

Thanks.

Love, Gail
peace....

Jr Ewing said...

When I look at these pictures, I wonder:
1. How many of these soldiers are there to serve their country? Nationalistic.
2. Are they there for the financial benefits and job security?
3. Do they really believe in all the propaganda of the mullah's and Amidenijad.
Remember the military marched like this in 1978, then within the year turned and supported the new regime.

Naj said...

JR Erwing,

Military service in Iran is mandatory. But, there are also people who volunteer to work for army; for no pay. And there are others who work for the army for financial compensation.

But, when threatened by external enemy, all Iranians, whether supporters of Mullahs or not, will unite and kick ass, as they did against American-led Iran war in the 80s! In that case, a bit of training and discipline won't hurt ;)

Anonymous said...

Jr Ewing:

Why are your soldiers fighting in Iraq?

Why did your pilots attack Serbia?

I suppose they believe imperilaist lies of your government, no?

Jr Ewing said...

I was just attempting, as an American, to understand the dynamics of military service in Iran. I agree with your comments about American servicepeople being asked to do something they might politically disagree with.
I was really trying to see how much discomfort there is in Iran toward the current government.

Naj said...

JR Erwing,

Iranians are ALWAYS "uncomfortable" with any kind of government they have. They only begin to realize it when they no longer have it.

So, the discomfort of Iran with its government is not a general thing; some like it and some don't. But no one in Iran has any discomfort with its military. We do need a strong army to DEFEND ourselves; History has taught us that we are vulnerable to external encroachment. Iranian military doesn't have black-water like mercenaries. Iranian army is not an expansionist one (like America's, like ISrael's or like IRaq's during Saddam).

Anonymous said...

Naj:

You wrote: "Iranians are ALWAYS "uncomfortable" with any kind of government they have.."

Very true.

JR Ewing said...

So in your opinion, how long do Iranians give the current regime?
I agree that Iran needs a strong military. I would disagree with your statement that Iran doesn't have black-water type mercenaries. What were Iran Revolutionary Guard soldiers doing in Iraq? And what about helping out Hezbollah?

Naj said...

JR,

This time around, Iranians have learned from previous revolution. They will not topple this "regime". This (what you call regime" is a government, elected by people, in several elections; and is operating under Iran's constitution which puts the supreme leader at the head of the state.

This system WILL transform with new generations. But, no one wants to "topple" them; and no one is really trying to do so--although Iranians like to nag and wish for it!

That's that!

Next question: people who go to lebanon, are not going because they are paid a huge salary! They are also not the army recruits. They really fight for a belief; for a cause.

The same is true for the revolutionary guards. These are very well trained, very well disciplined, very carefully selected soldiers. They do not always subscribe to strong ideology; but they are a somewhat independent entity--yes they hold a lot of power (like any fascist entity.) Their presence in Iraq, if true, is of the same nature as America's. They are there to help "friends".

Iran and America's interests in Iraq and in Afghanistan overlap. So you would see an overlap of "actions", inevitably. But, black-water soldiers are hired by a "private" corporation. The Revolutionary guards are not a private corporation (rather part of a state corporation).

Anonymous said...

We helped create Hizbullah to protect Muslims againstg depradations of your erstwhile allie - Israel. And we are proud of that - we save the people of Lebanon against the machinations of your government.

We were not about to watch the people with whom we have had ties of religion and blood for over 500 years be destroyed by your friends.


In regards to Iraq - your government had a very belligerent policy on the ground against Iran. Your fighter airplances kept on invading our air-space hoping to provoke us. We had to do what we could to reduce the threat against us. In the same time, we helped our allies in Iraq with whom we also have had ties of religion and blood for centuries.

I am certain that there are Iranian intelligence agents and special forces.

But the Revolutionary Guards are more similar to the People's Army of China.

pen Name

Naj said...

Pen,

Isn't Baseej more like the People's Army of China?

When I was growing up, there were two groups to fear: Comitee and Sepaah! The police and teh army were the good ones, and these two former ones the "bad" ones, i.e the "revolutionary" ones :)

What has become of committee now?

I never knew much about these people.

(Yes I know Iran has better-than-sepaah trained forces TOO!)

Anonymous said...

People's Liberation Army is like a government within a government. They have their own enterprises and companies. They make money.

Sepah is now geared towards asymmetrical warfare - at least in the minds of the military planners.

Some of my highschool class mates joined sepah but later left because they were not very religious.

Our problem is that there seems only to be 2 rules: there is no rule, 2: do not forget the first rule.

I am very upset about Khanum-e Saberi - this country is not safe for a Muslim woman and her life and her namus is in danger - like marhum Zahra Kazemi. And country is called Islamic Republic!

May God saves us from these fools - yek mosht ahmagh.

http://www.fardanews.com/fa/pages/?cid=80752

pen Name

Naj said...

Pen,

I think this is a political game playing and I really think se will be released. Unless this game is being played AGAINST Ahmadinejad ... then I will worry for her. I will also worry if this game is being played to antagonize America.

But, at least a number of high-profile conservatives are showing concern for her now. Case of Kazemi happened without even a trial! (an dI honestly think she was killed accidentally--they didn't plan to kill her ... yes idiots ... and no i agree with you that neither men nor women are safe in the hands of some of these psychos... they don't have any religion; they are of the same brand of (in)humanity as the torturers of Abu-Gharib.)